What To Do With Santa As A Peaceful Parent

Around this time last year, I wrote a piece called Squaring Santa where I dove into the myth and tackled the childism inherent in a cultural collaboration to deceive kids. Upon re-reading it, I’ve realized it comes across as strongly worded and for good reason. Learning the truth about Santa as a child shattered the magic of Christmas for me. No, Christmas was never about Santa or gifts. What hurt me was that my parents had lied to me and encouraged me to believe something they knew was untrue. Christmas was tarnished from that point and it took getting caught up in the excitement of my own children around the Christmas season to regain much of what I had lost. That’s just my story though. I know millions of people perpetuate the Santa myth because they had warm cozies about it as kids and that nostalgia can make it difficult to see the lie for what it is.

Last week, I was looking for matching pajamas for my family and I saw some with little Black Santas. As I considered the cost, I realized how strange it was that I had no problem with Santa PJs considering how I feel about the Santa tradition. Out of curiosity and a desire to explore, I asked friends if anyone among them chose not to participate in the Santa tradition and why. The most common response what that they didn’t want to deceive their kids and break their trust. Some noted that their children had expressed reservations about a strange man breaking into their homes while they were sleeping. Some went further to say they preferred to talk about the life of St. Nicholas of Myra. Others said they do participate in the Santa tradition in some form, but do not employ the behavioral tactics to pressure their kids into being “good.” And still others said their children understand it’s a game and not real, so they aren’t being duped, but they’re still enjoying the make-believe excitement of it all. Everything they said resonated with me.

There is no denying how ubiquitous Santa has become in the United States. He’s part of our cultural vision of Christmas, for better or worse. Schools really push Santa as well. It can be hard to be a child in this country and not wonder about whether Santa is real. So, first, I want to affirm everyone who does not wish to participate in the Santa tradition at all for whatever reason. Do whatever it is that makes sense for your family. I would advise against demonizing Santa or ignoring that the tradition exists at all, because doing so could create a major conflict for your children. It could also push them to condemn their friends or take up a position of superiority.

If You Don’t Want to Participate in the Santa Tradition At All

  1. Decide what you want your child to know, making sure to recognize that you will not be able to completely avoid Santa during the Christmas season.
  2. Give your child the words to say when people (especially other children) ask them about Santa. Specifically, work with your child to prepare responses to “What do you want Santa to bring you?” And, “Have you been good this year?” Children typically don’t want to get entangled in a lengthy discussion, so sidestepping the questions can be useful.
    • “What do you want Santa to bring you?” Response: “I’d love to get [gift] for Christmas this year.”
    • “Have you been good this year?” Response: “I don’t think kids should be rewarded for being good or punished for being bad.”
  3. Explain that it is considered bad form to intrude on others participating in the Santa tradition. If you want your child to tell the truth to other children about Santa, that is your prerogative and it is the anti-childist position. However, if you’d prefer to encourage your child to extend grace, you can let them know it’s ok not to discuss Santa at all with other children (or simply use the canned responses you have prepared together).

If You Do Want to Participate in the Santa Tradition Without the Childism

  1. Tell your child the truth. Santa is a myth. However, Santa is also a fun cultural tradition that your child can participate in with full knowledge of reality.
  2. Teach your child the history of Santa, including the origins in St. Nicholas of Myra, as well as differences in the Santa tradition around the world.
  3. Share other cultures’ holiday traditions, particularly the ways in which they infuse kindness and generosity into their holidays.
  4. Introduce Santa images with a variety of complexions rather than perpetuating white supremacy in the form of white Santa only.

Now, about that Elf on the Shelf…

3 thoughts on “What To Do With Santa As A Peaceful Parent

  1. Hi Peaceful Mom. Great post and has me thinking. When I was a kid I don’t think I every associated Santa with gifts until I got into school. I remember having a “stocking” but not the stories. Hmm….interesting. I was either too scarred to remember or it didn’t resonate. There’s so many involving kids isn’t there…the tooth fairy, Easter bunny…. ugh the list goes on.

    Liked by 1 person

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